Wednesday, July 13, 2005

Notes on Baseball's All-Star Game

"The only bad thing about winning the pennant is that you have to manage the All-Star Game the next year. I'd rather go fishing for three days."
Whitey Herzog, former baseball manager

On The Mark and I were talking late this afternoon wondering why the National League was even going to show up for the baseball All-Star Game. American League players are just so much better.

On our elevator news channel, I saw that USA Today mentioned that 27 million hot dogs were going to be consumed this baseball season. I guess that is what you call job stability for current and future heart surgeons.

The Most Valuable Player of the game was Miguel Tejada from the Baltimore Orioles. For winning MVP he was awarded a brand new, fully loaded Chevrolet Corvette, which is probably on the high side worth $60k. He makes $10.7 million a year. I wonder if he really cares about the car? Chevrolet would be better off donating the car or the money the car would cost to a charity.

The game was a nice diversion from thinking about how corrupt and self-serving our politicians are on both sides of the aisle.

3 comments:

Jack's Shack said...

I am still a National League guy.

someguy said...

Being a lot closer to 50 than I'd prefer, I remember when your first paragraph applied to the AL, Misanthrope. Growing up as an A's fan, the All-Star game usually wasn't much fun to watch.

And I agree 100% about the car. I mean, did they throw in an electric dog polisher, too?

The Misanthrope said...

Someguy, I am right there with you getting too close to nearing the more than halfway mark. I too recall when the AL was terrible and all the announcers used to talk about the days of Babe Ruth when the NL guys would just watch the AL take batting practice.

I saw a great quote when I was writing this from Herzog that said, "I only need two key players to win the the pennant, Babe Ruth and Sandy Koufax."

Jack, please don't say you like the Dodgers. How can you when management is so bad and the ballpark has become one big advertising billboard. The owner is a liar and the general manager just looks at stats not chemistry.