Tuesday, July 12, 2005

On The Mark -- Order in the House

A trial concluded recently in Southern California. A 13-year-old boy was found guilty of murder. He clubbed a fellow baseball player in the knees and then over the head with a baseball bat. The sentence hasn't been handed down yet, but he'll probably get the maximum of 12 years.

The convicted boy was wrong, of course. But, based on testimony, the circumstances leading up to the incident demonstrate some of the points I've been making over the past several months regarding discipline and following the rules. Apparently, again based on testimony for the defense, and reported by local news media, the victim was alleged to be a bully. He was known to throw his baseball helmet. He was known to throw his bat at infielders. He was known to double flip off umpires if he didn't like a call. If you read the reports, it appears that he got away with much of these antics without repercussions. Apparently, the victim was picking on the 13-year-old and this boy couldn't take any more.

When I played baseball, if I threw my helmet, I was suspended for one game. If the manager didn't do it, then my dad did it for him. If I had flipped off an umpire? Well, let's just say I would have been reading a lot of books that summer.

As I've stated many times before, and I know it makes me sound like a republican, but rules are too lax now and people are taking advantage of it -- young and old. Racing through red lights, even with baby strollers in the crosswalk, firecrackers going off from 3 July to 5 July in fire danger zones, and so on.

We need to get some order in the house.

10 comments:

B2 said...

Hear, hear. And I still believe that you can have common sense, decency, and an understanding of the responsibilities of being a good citizen without being a [shiver] Republican.

Chandira said...

You old Republican you... ;-)

Nah, I totally agree. We're living in the age of the brat.. I get driven nuts by all these liberal parents (EEyye!! Now I sound like a republican...!!) who don't discipline kids. Kids f***ing well need it! I did..

(I still do!)

The Misanthrope said...

Parents don't discipline their kids today. I know my sister just threatens and threatens with timeout and taking this away or that away and never follows through, which is awful.

Jack's Shack said...

I hear you.

Hamel said...

I couldn'g agree more. If I would have flipped off an umpire growing up, I swear I'd have eight fingers now. My mother would have ripped off one, and my father the other.

But I never would have flipped off anyone else.

Now it's all about "What did you do to my poor son to make him react that way."

Some kids need a boot in the a$$, as that's the only logic they understand.

bitchphd said...

See, I think it is NOT the liberal parents who are the problem here, but the Republican ones. The parents whose sense of entitlement and complete lack of respect for the public sphere extends to their children, the parents who think that "I'm paying for it" (college, summer camp, whatever) means "I'm entitled to satisfaction," with "satisfaction" defined as "don't you correct my child." I think that it's an inherently Republican value to think that "parental responsibility" for children means "society as a whole has no responsibility towards children," which means that (if the children are poor or brown) their "parents need to take responsibility" and (if the children are mine or my friend's) "other people have no business talking to or interfering with my kids."

Nigela said...

After student-teaching in a 3rd grade classroom and sitting in on parent conferences this is what I came to understand about the current modes of discipline when both parents work, which 90% of my students' families do. So they come home at the end of the day, feeling a little guilty about not being home with their children and all they want to do is spend a little time with them before they're asleep. When the kids misbehave, which kids do, the parents indulge, because they only get three hours with their kid a day. They try to be their friend, rather than their parent and then complain to the teachers that the school isn't instilling discipline. The same goes for parents with split custody, though it's usually worse. Teachers are taught to be teachers first, friends second, and parents need to learn that lesson even more, IMHO.

Nigela said...

Misanthrope-- after student-teaching in a 3rd grade classroom and sitting in on parent conferences this is what I came to understand about the current modes of discipline when both parents work, which 90% of my students' families do. So they come home at the end of the day, feeling a little guilty about not being home with their children and all they want to do is spend a little time with them before they're asleep. When the kids misbehave, which kids do, the parents indulge, because they only get three hours with their kid a day. They try to be their friend, rather than their parent and then complain to the teachers that the school isn't instilling discipline. The same goes for parents with split custody, though it's usually worse. Teachers are taught to be teachers first, friends second, and parents need to learn that lesson even more, IMHO.

On The Mark said...

Thanks, everyone, for your comments. I agree with everyone. I like a combination of bitchphd and Nigela because the problem is as much with adults as it is with kids (not just about giving discipline, but leading by example).

Josh said...

My wife, who's a teacher, saw one of the school's best students in the office and asked what he was doing there. He said, "I finally snapped. I couldn't take it any more." This kid was in grade 4.

I suspect, though, that there have been bullies ever since humans learned to walk upright, and possibly before that. It might not help so much to blame parents, because some people just won't ever get it.

We need to protect kids so that they don't ever get to the point where they might "snap." How do we do that? Probably through better coaching, umpiring, teaching, mentoring, etc. I doubt we can do anything about other people's parenting.